What is the main function of the digestive system

what is the main function of the digestive system

The Structure and Function of the Digestive System

Aug 04, The three main functions of the human digestive system are to break food down into chyme for the body's use, to secrete and absorb nutrients and bodily fluids into the gastrointestinal tract or the blood, and to store and eliminate waste. The digestive system has major parts and accessory parts. The movement pushes food and liquid through your GI tract and mixes the contents within each organ. The muscle behind the food contracts and squeezes the food forward, while the muscle in front of the food relaxes to allow the food to move. The digestive process .

Digestion is necessary for absorbing nutrients from food and occurs through two processes: mechanical and chemical digestion. What temperature is powder coating baked to proper functioning of the gastrointestinal GI tract is imperative for our well being and life -long health.

A non-functioning or poorly-functioning GI tract can be the source of many chronic health problems that can interfere with your what is the main function of the digestive system of life.

Here is a look at the importance of two main functions of the digestive system: digestion and absorption. The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for the breakdown and absorption of the various foods and liquids needed to sustain life. Many different organs have essential roles in the digestion of food, from the mechanical breakdown of food by the teeth to the creation of bile an emulsifier by the liver.

Bile production plays a important role in digestion: it is stored and concentrated in the gallbladder during fasting stages, and discharged to the small intestine. Pancreatic juices are excreted into the digestive system to break down complex molecules such as proteins and fats.

Each component of the digestive system plays a special role in these complimentary processes. The structure of each component highlights the function of that particular organ, providing a seamless anatomy to keep our body what is the ascension in the catholic church and healthy.

The digestive system is comprised of the alimentary canal, or the digestive tract, and other accessory organs that play a part in digestionsuch as the liver, the gallbladder, and the pancreas. The alimentary canal and the GI tract are terms that are sometimes used interchangeably. The alimentary canal is the long tube that runs from the mouth where the food enters to the anus where indigestible waste leaves.

The organs in the alimentary canal include the mouth the site of masticationthe esophagus, the stomach, the small and large intestines, the rectum, and the anus. Before food can be used it has to be mechanically broken down into tiny pieces, then chemically broken down so nutrients can be absorbed. In humans, proteins need to be broken down into amino acids, starches into sugars, and fats into fatty acids and glycerol.

This mechanical and chemical breakdown encompasses the process of digestion. Digestion begins in the mouth. A brain reflex triggers the flow of saliva when we see or even think about food. Enzymes in saliva then begin the chemical breakdown of food; teeth aid in the mechanical breakdown of larger food particles.

Saliva moistens the food, while the teeth masticate the food and make it easier to swallow. To accomplish this moistening goal, the salivary glands produce an estimated three liters of saliva per day. Amylase, the digestive enzyme found in saliva, starts to break down starch into simple sugars before the how to make a cuckoo clock work even leaves the mouth. The nervous pathway involved in salivary excretion requires stimulation of receptors in the mouth, sensory impulses to the brain stem, and parasympathetic impulses to salivary glands.

Once food is moistened and rolled and ready to swallow, it is known as a bolus. For swallowing to happen correctly a combination of 25 muscles must all work together at the same time.

Swallowing occurs when the muscles in your tongue and mouth move the bolus into your pharynx. A small flap of skin called the epiglottis closes over the pharynx to prevent food from entering the trachea, which would cause choking.

Instead, food is pushed into the muscular tube called the esophagus. Waves of muscle movement, called peristalsis, move the bolus down to the stomach. While in the digestive tract, the food is really passing through the body rather than being in the body. The smooth muscles of the tubular digestive organs move the food efficiently along as it is broken down into easily absorbed ions and molecules. Once the bolus reaches the stomach, gastric juices mix with the partially what are the songs in the nutcracker suite food and continue the breakdown process.

The bolus is converted into a slimy material called chyme. Major digestive hormones : There are at least five major digestive hormones in the gut of mammals that help process food through chemical digestion in the gall bladder, duodenum, stomach, and pancrease. These hormones are cholecystokinin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, motilin, secretin, and gastrin. The stomach is a muscular bag that maneuvers food particles, mixing highly acidic gastric juice and powerful digestive enzymes with the chyme to prepare for nutrient absorption in the small intestine.

Stimulatory hormones such as gastrin and motilin help the stomach pump gastric juice and move chyme. The complex network of hormones eventually prepares chyme for entry into the duodenum, the first segment of the small intestine.

During absorption, the nutrients that come from food such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals pass through the wall of the small what conservation of energy means and into the bloodstream. In this way nutrients can be distributed throughout the rest of the body.

The small intestine increases surface area for absorption through tiny interior projections, like small fingers, called villi. In the large intestine there is resorption of water and absorption of certain minerals as feces are formed. Feces are the waste parts of the food that the body passes out through the anus. Learning Objectives Describe the processes and functions of the digestive system.

Key Points Two important functions of the digestive system are digestion and absorption. The nutrients that come from food are derived from proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. These complex macromolecules must be broken down and absorbed in the gastrointestinal GI tract.

Mechanical digestion starts in the mouth, with the physical processing of food by the teeth, and continues in the stomach. Chemical digestion starts with the release of enzymes in saliva, and continues in the stomach and intestines.

During absorption, the nutrients that come from food pass through the wall of the small intestine and into the bloodstream. Key Terms mastication : The process of mechanical breakdown by the teeth; also known as chewing. The digestive system is a broader term that includes other structures, including the accessory organs of digestion, such as the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.

The Digestive System The proper functioning of the gastrointestinal GI tract is imperative for our that s what i call music being and life -long health. Digestion The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for the breakdown and absorption of the various foods and liquids needed to sustain life. Absorption Absorption occurs in the small intestines, where nutrients directly enter the bloodstream.

Components of the Digestive System The digestive system is comprised of the alimentary canal, or the digestive tract, and other accessory organs that play a part in digestionsuch as the liver, the gallbladder, and the pancreas. To recap these twin processes: Mechanical digestion: Larger pieces of food get broken down into smaller pieces while being prepared for chemical digestion; this process starts in the mouth and continues into the stomach. Chemical digestion: Several different enzymes break down macromolecules into smaller molecules that can be absorbed.

The process starts in the mouth and continues into the intestines. Moistening and Breakdown of Food Digestion begins in the mouth. Swallowing and the Movement of Food For swallowing to happen correctly a combination of 25 muscles must all work together at the same time.

Large-scale Breakdown in the Stomach Once the bolus reaches the stomach, gastric juices mix with the partially digested food and continue the breakdown process. Absorption in the Small Intestine During absorption, the nutrients that come from food such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals pass through the wall of the small intestine and into the bloodstream. Waste Compaction in the Large Intestine In the large intestine there is resorption of water and absorption of certain minerals as feces are formed.

Key Points

The function of the digestive system is digestion and absorption. Digestion is the breakdown of food into small molecules, which are then absorbed into the body. The digestive system is divided into two major parts: The digestive tract (alimentary canal) is a continuous tube . Aug 14, Two important functions of the digestive system are digestion and absorption. The nutrients that come from food are derived from proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. These complex macromolecules must be broken down and absorbed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Mechanical digestion starts in the mouth, with the physical processing of food by the teeth, and . Jan 16, The digestive system has three main functions: digestion of food, absorption of nutrients, and elimination of solid food waste. Digestion is the process of breaking down food into components the body can absorb. It consists of two types of processes: mechanical digestion and chemical digestion.

The digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal tractalso called the GI tract or digestive tractand the liver , pancreas , and gallbladder. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The hollow organs that make up the GI tract are the mouth, esophagus , stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus.

The liver, pancreas, and gallbladder are the solid organs of the digestive system. The small intestine has three parts. The first part is called the duodenum. The jejunum is in the middle and the ileum is at the end. The large intestine includes the appendix , cecum, colon , and rectum.

The appendix is a finger-shaped pouch attached to the cecum. The cecum is the first part of the large intestine. The colon is next. The rectum is the end of the large intestine. Bacteria in your GI tract, also called gut flora or microbiome, help with digestion. Parts of your nervous and circulatory systems also help. Working together, nerves, hormones , bacteria, blood, and the organs of your digestive system digest the foods and liquids you eat or drink each day.

Digestion is important because your body needs nutrients from food and drink to work properly and stay healthy. Proteins , fats , carbohydrates , vitamins , minerals , and water are nutrients. Your digestive system breaks nutrients into parts small enough for your body to absorb and use for energy, growth, and cell repair. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you meet your individual health needs. Each part of your digestive system helps to move food and liquid through your GI tract, break food and liquid into smaller parts, or both.

Once foods are broken into small enough parts, your body can absorb and move the nutrients to where they are needed. Your large intestine absorbs water, and the waste products of digestion become stool. Nerves and hormones help control the digestive process.

Food moves through your GI tract by a process called peristalsis. The large, hollow organs of your GI tract contain a layer of muscle that enables their walls to move. The movement pushes food and liquid through your GI tract and mixes the contents within each organ. The muscle behind the food contracts and squeezes the food forward, while the muscle in front of the food relaxes to allow the food to move.

Food starts to move through your GI tract when you eat. When you swallow, your tongue pushes the food into your throat. A small flap of tissue, called the epiglottis, folds over your windpipe to prevent choking and the food passes into your esophagus.

Once you begin swallowing, the process becomes automatic. Your brain signals the muscles of the esophagus and peristalsis begins. Lower esophageal sphincter. When food reaches the end of your esophagus, a ringlike musclecalled the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes and lets food pass into your stomach.

After food enters your stomach, the stomach muscles mix the food and liquid with digestive juices. The stomach slowly empties its contents, called chyme , into your small intestine. Small intestine.

The muscles of the small intestine mix food with digestive juices from the pancreas, liver, and intestine, and push the mixture forward for further digestion. The walls of the small intestine absorb water and the digested nutrients into your bloodstream. As peristalsis continues, the waste products of the digestive process move into the large intestine.

Large intestine. Waste products from the digestive process include undigested parts of food, fluid, and older cells from the lining of your GI tract. The large intestine absorbs water and changes the waste from liquid into stool. Peristalsis helps move the stool into your rectum. The lower end of your large intestine, the rectum, stores stool until it pushes stool out of your anus during a bowel movement.

Watch this video to see how food moves through your GI tract. As food moves through your GI tract, your digestive organs break the food into smaller parts using:. The digestive process starts in your mouth when you chew. Your salivary glands make saliva , a digestive juice, which moistens food so it moves more easily through your esophagus into your stomach. Saliva also has an enzyme that begins to break down starches in your food.

After you swallow, peristalsis pushes the food down your esophagus into your stomach. Glands in your stomach lining make stomach acid and enzymes that break down food. Muscles of your stomach mix the food with these digestive juices. Your pancreas makes a digestive juice that has enzymes that break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

The pancreas delivers the digestive juice to the small intestine through small tubes called ducts. Your liver makes a digestive juice called bile that helps digest fats and some vitamins. Bile ducts carry bile from your liver to your gallbladder for storage, or to the small intestine for use. Your gallbladder stores bile between meals. When you eat, your gallbladder squeezes bile through the bile ducts into your small intestine.

Your small intestine makes digestive juice, which mixes with bile and pancreatic juice to complete the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Bacteria in your small intestine make some of the enzymes you need to digest carbohydrates. Your small intestine moves water from your bloodstream into your GI tract to help break down food. Your small intestine also absorbs water with other nutrients. In your large intestine, more water moves from your GI tract into your bloodstream.

Bacteria in your large intestine help break down remaining nutrients and make vitamin K. Waste products of digestion, including parts of food that are still too large, become stool.

The small intestine absorbs most of the nutrients in your food, and your circulatory system passes them on to other parts of your body to store or use.

Special cells help absorbed nutrients cross the intestinal lining into your bloodstream. Your blood carries simple sugars, amino acids, glycerol, and some vitamins and salts to the liver. Your liver stores, processes, and delivers nutrients to the rest of your body when needed. The lymph system , a network of vessels that carry white blood cells and a fluid called lymph throughout your body to fight infection, absorbs fatty acids and vitamins. Your body uses sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycerol to build substances you need for energy, growth, and cell repair.

Your hormones and nerves work together to help control the digestive process. Signals flow within your GI tract and back and forth from your GI tract to your brain. Cells lining your stomach and small intestine make and release hormones that control how your digestive system works. These hormones tell your body when to make digestive juices and send signals to your brain that you are hungry or full. Your pancreas also makes hormones that are important to digestion.

You have nerves that connect your central nervous systemyour brain and spinal cordto your digestive system and control some digestive functions. For example, when you see or smell food, your brain sends a signal that causes your salivary glands to "make your mouth water" to prepare you to eat. When food stretches the walls of your GI tract, the nerves of your ENS release many different substances that speed up or delay the movement of food and the production of digestive juices. The nerves send signals to control the actions of your gut muscles to contract and relax to push food through your intestines.

Griffin P. Rodgers explaining the importance of participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials that are currently open and are recruiting can be viewed at www. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Why is digestion important?

How does my digestive system work? How does food move through my GI tract? How does my digestive system break food into small parts my body can use? What happens to the digested food? How does my body control the digestive process? Clinical Trials What is the digestive system? The digestive system Bacteria in your GI tract, also called gut flora or microbiome, help with digestion.

Proteins break into amino acids Fats break into fatty acids and glycerol Carbohydrates break into simple sugars MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you meet your individual health needs. Your digestive system breaks nutrients into parts that are small enough for your body to absorb. The digestive process starts when you put food in your mouth.

As food moves through your GI tract, your digestive organs break the food into smaller parts using: motion, such as chewing, squeezing, and mixing digestive juices, such as stomach acid, bile , and enzymes Mouth. Hormones Cells lining your stomach and small intestine make and release hormones that control how your digestive system works. Nerves You have nerves that connect your central nervous systemyour brain and spinal cordto your digestive system and control some digestive functions.

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